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SOSNO: An artwork may hide another!

SOSNO: An artwork may hide another!

"Un saut vers un matin serein..."

 

He drew attention to himself by creating vacuum. This artist succeeded in imposing his “Pièges à regards” (eye traps) for 40 years by masking part of his works. 75-year old Sacha Sosno lives and works in the hills of Nice and has not toned down his creative passion.

Sosno became what he is now on a battle field, when he was still known as Alexandre Sosnoswsky. Between 1967 and 1969, as a photographer, he covered conflicts in Northern Ireland, Bngladesh and Biafra. He brought back harsh images, but above all, he brought back the deep feeling that wars are always dead ends. “When you have lived through the muddles of geopolitics, you no longer believe in nice images and fine talk. I was a reporter for two years. You risk your neck. After a while, nihilism catches up with you and you say to yourself: what’s the point?”

From the theatre of operations to that of obliterations
Sosno will not have seen the horrors of war in vain. He began to research on matter while on his missions as a reporter. Back from the front, the photographer gave way to the artist. “Neither journalism nor art will change anything. But at the time, I said to myself that with my paintings and sculptures I could give my contemporaries some pleasure, create a space for dreaming.”
So, Sacha Sosno really found his vocation when touching up his war photographs. “By deleting with a felt pen some areas of a photo that were too unbearable, I saw an image appear that was to become a real concept and a medium of aesthetic perception”. The notion of obliteration was born: hiding in order to see better... “I went from painting to sculpture, drawing inspiration from archetypes of Greek classical art or other repertoires rooted in collective memory. I “obliterate” them by hollowing them, covering them or with bars because I think that art is in the viewer’s mind. The least you show, the more the imagination can do its work.”

Architecture-sculpture
“One of my theories is that artists must take to the streets, give things to see to as many people as possible, because not everybody goes to museums”, said Sacha as soon as the subject of architecture was broached. He has held this passion for long and it led him to combine his own art with architecture in the eighties. “I may have missed a career as an architect. My father did not want me to attend the Beaux-Arts school. After I passed the baccalaureate, I took my independence and moved to Paris where I went to the Beaux-Arts without him knowing. I always thought that building places for working, sleeping or dreaming was the finest human activity. I think that artists are not involved enough in that field!” Sosno did not hesitate to express this regret in China to the high dignitaries who welcomed him to Beijing in 2007 for the unveiling of one of his sculptures, “Un saut vers un matin serein” (Jumping towards a serene morning). “I told them that their glass façades in the Chicago style of the twenties were beautiful but out of place in a country where ideograms could be a formidable source of inspiration for inhabited sculptures.”
Sacha Sosno was one of the first artists to take action on that issue. Between 1986 and 1988, he created sculptures linked to architecture, notably two monumental bronzes for a luxury hotel in Nice. 20 years later, he went back to architecture with a big challenge: to fit the entire Nice public library and its staff in an immense concrete head. “The Tête Carrée (Square Head) is the winner of a two-round national competition launched by the then minister of Culture. I won the contest together with two architects, Yves Bayard and Henri Vidal.” It was the world’s first inhabited sculpture. This major achievement is the one Sosno is most proud of “because it has a further use than being a mere visual delight. It shows that the economic world’s money can be used to do things that do not waste it. I regret that this principle has not become widespread”. Sosno is working on another project in Seoul – an inhabited sculpture on the river, called “La poutre dans l’œil du voisin” (The beam in one’s neighbour’s eye).”

His projects
“Two exhibitions in 2013! One at Ferrero’s, the other at Jean-Antoine Hierro’s”. His latest public commission, the tail of a diving whale, was unveiled in October in the Port of Nice. Nowadays he is busy with another project. “To set up a cemetery for artists. I found a plot of land on the Colline du Château which would be suitable for some forty unique monuments... I would like my molecules to rest there, facing the sea, inside a sculpture which I have already made. Also, for the town, it would be a way of preserving the memory of the Ecole de Nice’s artists.”
    
Olivier Marro

He drew attention to himself by creating vacuum. This artist succeeded in imposing his “Pièges à regards” (eye traps) for 40 years by masking part of his works. 75-year old Sacha Sosno lives and works in the hills of Nice and has not toned down his creative passion.Sosno became what he is now on a battle field, when he was still known as Alexandre Sosnoswsky. Between 1967 and 1969, as a photographer, he covered conflicts in Northern Ireland, Bngladesh and Biafra. He brought back harsh images, but above all, he brought back the deep feeling that wars are always dead ends. “When you have lived through the muddles of geopolitics, you no longer believe in nice images and fine talk. I was a reporter for two years. You risk your neck. After a while, nihilism catches up with you and you say to yourself: what’s the point?”From the theatre of operations to that of obliterationsSosno will not have seen the horrors of war in vain. He began to research on matter while on his missions as a reporter. Back from the front, the photographer gave way to the artist. “Neither journalism nor art will change anything. But at the time, I said to myself that with my paintings and sculptures I could give my contemporaries some pleasure, create a space for dreaming.”So, Sacha Sosno really found his vocation when touching up his war photographs. “By deleting with a felt pen some areas of a photo that were too unbearable, I saw an image appear that was to become a real concept and a medium of aesthetic perception”. The notion of obliteration was born: hiding in order to see better... “I went from painting to sculpture, drawing inspiration from archetypes of Greek classical art or other repertoires rooted in collective memory. I “obliterate” them by hollowing them, covering them or with bars because I think that art is in the viewer’s mind. The least you show, the more the imagination can do its work.”Architecture-sculpture“One of my theories is that artists must take to the streets, give things to see to as many people as possible, because not everybody goes to museums”, said Sacha as soon as the subject of architecture was broached. He has held this passion for long and it led him to combine his own art with architecture in the eighties. “I may have missed a career as an architect. My father did not want me to attend the Beaux-Arts school. After I passed the baccalaureate, I took my independence and moved to Paris where I went to the Beaux-Arts without him knowing. I always thought that building places for working, sleeping or dreaming was the finest human activity. I think that artists are not involved enough in that field!” Sosno did not hesitate to express this regret in China to the high dignitaries who welcomed him to Beijing in 2007 for the unveiling of one of his sculptures, “Un saut vers un matin serein” (Jumping towards a serene morning). “I told them that their glass façades in the Chicago style of the twenties were beautiful but out of place in a country where ideograms could be a formidable source of inspiration for inhabited sculptures.”Sacha Sosno was one of the first artists to take action on that issue. Between 1986 and 1988, he created sculptures linked to architecture, notably two monumental bronzes for a luxury hotel in Nice. 20 years later, he went back to architecture with a big challenge: to fit the entire Nice public library and its staff in an immense concrete head. “The Tête Carrée (Square Head) is the winner of a two-round national competition launched by the then minister of Culture. I won the contest together with two architects, Yves Bayard and Henri Vidal.” It was the world’s first inhabited sculpture. This major achievement is the one Sosno is most proud of “because it has a further use than being a mere visual delight. It shows that the economic world’s money can be used to do things that do not waste it. I regret that this principle has not become widespread”. Sosno is working on another project in Seoul – an inhabited sculpture on the river, called “La poutre dans l’œil du voisin” (The beam in one’s neighbour’s eye).”His projects“Two exhibitions in 2013! One at Ferrero’s, the other at Jean-Antoine Hierro’s”. His latest public commission, the tail of a diving whale, was unveiled in October in the Port of Nice. Nowadays he is busy with another project. “To set up a cemetery for artists. I found a plot of land on the Colline du Château which would be suitable for some forty unique monuments... I would like my molecules to rest there, facing the sea, inside a sculpture which I have already made. Also, for the town, it would be a way of preserving the memory of the Ecole de Nice’s artists.”    Olivier Marro

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Actualité principale
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51
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